Crazy Fire in Brazilian Shooting Range

Brazilian military police faced a sudden raging inferno during routine shotgun shooting practice on November 23rd. Two videos recently appeared on YouTube (below) showing the moments before and during the fire ignited in the floor in front of one of the officers.

First is a camera angle from the left side of the range:

The fire appears to start on the floor in front of the shooter on the far left. It seems a spark from one of his rounds dropped into a crack in the material on the floor, causing something to start burning. In just two seconds the fire expands to fill the room, then retracts momentarily, and expands further.

This is another angle from the back of the room. The timing is not synced and in this video the fire starts at 1:25.

At 1:31 in that video the fire seems to have moved from the flooring to the walls.

The agency involved is unclear but the word RONDAC appears clearly on the back of one uniform, which is military police in Brazil. One of the videos indicates this is from the city of Belém, which is the capital of the state of Pará in northern Brazil.

Image and map data from Google Maps.

Both sources indicate that no one was injured in this incident, but we have not been able to find any reliable source to verify the full details of the incident.

Since we have a lot of Brazilians living in West Boca Raton, Florida, we thought this story might be of interest to our readers.

Ted Deutch’s “Climate” Handout to Farmers

Congressman Ted Deutch, a resident of West Boca Raton, is in the news today thanks to his bill that he claims will address climate change. What the mainstream media is not covering is how this bill would affect people and who benefits. A review of the bill text shows it’s designed to redistribute wealth and the biggest beneficiaries are farmers.

Deutch calls the bill “The Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act of 2018”. The general idea is to have a tax on greenhouse gas emissions (aka a carbon tax or fee) imposed “upstream” so the tax is not visible to consumers when they pay for things that are affected. Some of the money would be rebated to people – the so-called carbon dividend.

As always the devil is in the details and there’s a lot in this bill. The tax would start at $15 per metric ton of greenhouse gas emissions. A gallon of gas accounts for 0.009 metric tons. A 15-gallon tank is associated with 0.133 metric tons. So a 15-gallon tank of gas would cost an extra $2 for the consumer.

That’s where it starts. Every year the tax goes up $10 per ton, or another $1.33 per 15-gallon tank. In 3 years that means the cost of a 15-gallon tank is up by $5, not just $2.

It’s not just gasoline. It’s other fuels including coal and natural gas. But it’s also “carbon-intensive products” including:

iron, steel, steel mill products (including pipe and tube), aluminum, cement, glass (including flat, container, and specialty glass and fiberglass), pulp, paper, chemicals, or industrial ceramics.

So anything you buy that has steel, aluminum, glass, cement, and more in it will see price increases.

The most remarkable thing is the handout to farmers. They’re exempt from the tax. Technically they buy whatever fuel they buy at the same increased price as the rest of us, but they get the money back directly from the government. There’s an extra provision protecting farmers even more:

The carbon fee shall not be levied upon non-fossil fuel greenhouse gas emissions which occur on a farm.

Agriculture is responsible for roughly 8% of US greenhouse gas emissions. It’s unclear why, as a policy matter, farmers should get a break from a tax the rest of us all pay. As a political matter it’s just one more example of farmers having outsize influence on politicians like Deutch.

Then we get to what happens with the money. This breaks down into two separate categories. Some of the money is collected from imports in the Carbon Border Fee. That money “may be used to supplement appropriations”. In other words, it goes straight to the government. Despite Deutch’s sales pitch that the money goes back to the people, the border tax part of the bill goes to the government, not us.

For the tax imposed on items within the US, that money goes into the “Carbon Dividend Trust Fund.” Up to 8% of that money will go to administrative expenses. After expenses the money goes to people as follows:

A carbon dividend payment is one pro-rata share for each adult and half a pro-rata share for each child under 19 years old, with a limit of 2 children per household, of amounts available for the month in the Carbon Dividend Trust Fund.

To qualify you have to be a

natural living person who has a valid Social Security number or taxpayer identification number and is a citizen or lawful resident of the United States

There are 73 million people receiving Medicaid or other low-income government healthcare benefits. Each will receive a “pro-rata” (equal) share. The wealthy and the middle class emit more greenhouse gases and will pay a much higher share of the taxes but the money will be distributed equally so it’s a scheme to take from the rich and middle class and give to the poor.

Deutch and friends ignore the science that says “progressive income redistribution in the United States could result in an increase in household carbon dioxide emissions” because “poorer households spend a bigger proportion of their income on carbon-intensive products and services.”

But the biggest steal of all is the farmers. They’re eligible for the dividend even though they’re exempt from the tax.

Deutch’s one-page summary of the bill is below. It is full of unsupported claims about job creation and reduced pollution. The full pdf is below that. We reached out to Deutch on both Twitter and Facebook to ask about these issues. As usual he did not respond. Deutch only deals with journalists who do not ask him tough questions. That’s not personal to him, but rather is typical for incumbents of either party who are in safely gerrymandered districts. He’s still a nice guy and by all accounts a good neighbor.

The bill pdf is below.
energy_innovation_and_carbon_dividend_act_-_deutch

Live Rodent Closes Bagel Tree in Delray: RatOn Restaurant Report

Our latest inspection report is topped by the live rodent and droppings inspectors found at the Bagel Tree on Atlantic in Delray Beach. The inspection found 17 violations including 9 marked high priority, issued a stop sale order for temperature abuse, and closed the restaurant at least temporarily. We can’t tell if it has reopened yet. The worst violations were:

  • Employee touching ready-to-eat food with their bare hands – food was not being heated as a sole ingredient to 145 degrees F or immediately added to other ingredients to be cooked/heated to the minimum required temperature to allow bare hand contact. Establishment has no approved Alternative Operating Procedure….employee grabbed bagel with bare hand . Discussed with manager. Manager discarded bagel at time of inspection. **Corrected On-Site**
  • Live rodent present….live rodent on the trap underneath dry storage shelf
  • Live, small flying insects in kitchen, food preparation area, or food storage area….4 live flies landing on dirty towel at laundry basket by the exit door.
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food cold held at greater than 41 degrees Fahrenheit….single serve butter 71° at server station, single serve butter 49°, single serve cream cheese 50° in flip top reach in cooler at bagel station. Per manager food being held less than four hours. Manager time marked on food at time of inspection. **Corrective Action Taken** **Repeat Violation**
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food cooked/heated yesterday/on a previous day not cooled from 135 degrees Fahrenheit to 41 degrees Fahrenheit within a total of 6 hours. Food has been cooling overnight. ….Mozzaballs 45° , mushroom barley soup 46° in a 22 qt container at walk in cooler. food cooled in quantity deeper than 4 inches….. Per manager food was cooked yesterday. See stop sale issue . Operator discarded food at time of inspection. **Repeat Violation**
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food hot held at less than 135 degrees Fahrenheit or above…hot holding sweet and sour sauce 126° in steam table , after stirring food temperature 145° . Discussed with operator. **Corrective Action Taken**
  • Raw animal food stored over or with ready-to-eat food in reach-in freezer – not all products commercially packaged….raw pork chops, raw chicken above meat loaf, gyro in reach in freezer . Manager properly stored food at time of inspection. **Corrected On-Site**
  • Rodent activity present as evidenced by rodent droppings found….3 fresh rodent droppings beneath dry storage shelf, two dry rodent droppings underneath dry storage shelf at prep station .One dry rodent dropping by the exit door….approximately over 35 dry rodent droppings and approximately 15 fresh rodent droppings underneath bread shelf by by the water heater at bagel station
  • Stop Sale issued on potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food due to temperature abuse…. Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food cooked/heated yesterday/on a previous day not cooled from 135 degrees Fahrenheit to 41 degrees Fahrenheit within a total of 6 hours. Food has been cooling overnight. ….Mozzaballs 45° , mushroom barley soup 46° in a 22 qt container at walk in cooler . Per manager food was cooked yesterday. **Repeat Violation**

Mi Mexico at Smith Sundy Road in West Delray was also closed briefly after a bad inspection with 9 violations, 5 high priority and a stop sale order. We don’t see what was so bad that it required closure.

  • Live, small flying insects in kitchen, food preparation area, or food storage area approximately 2 flies flying one fly landing on the exterior reach in cooler.
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food cold held at greater than 41 degrees Fahrenheit…cooked pork 65°, cooked beef 66°, raw pork 59° in reach in cooler . Cheese 67° at kitchen, tomato sauces 88° by the sale window being held more than four hours. Stop sale issue . PIC stated she will take these food at home .
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food hot held at less than 135 degrees Fahrenheit or above….hot holding pork 191°, ground pork 98°, beef 89° at kitchen being held more than 4 hours. Stop sale issue.Operator stated she will take food at home.
  • Raw animal food stored over ready-to-eat food….raw beef above tortilla in reach in cooler . Discussed with operator.
  • Stop Sale issued on potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food due to temperature abuse…. Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food cold held at greater than 41 degrees Fahrenheit…cooked pork 65°, cooked beef 66°, raw pork 59° in reach in cooler . Cheese 67° at kitchen, tomato sauces 88° by the sale window being held more than four hours. …. Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food hot held at less than 135 degrees Fahrenheit or above….hot holding pork 191°, ground pork 98°, beef 89° at kitchen being held more than 4 hours.

Other than those two it was a pretty good report. No one had more than 20 violations. 3 G’s on Atlantic in Delray did have 14 violations with 10 high priority.

In West Boca, Madison’s New York Grill had 16 violations but only 3 of them were high priority. They had live small flying insects and a stop sale on Caesar dressing for temperature issues. Hong Kong Palace on Powerline had 14 violations, 2 high priority.

Good News

Five Guys near Town Center and Burger King near Boca Rio both had perfect inspections with no violations.

Grand Lux in Town Center was near perfect with just one violation. New York Prime also did well with only two minor violations.

Habit Burger on Military Trail had 3 violations.

Original Pancake House in Somerset Shoppes and Lucky Express on Clint Moore each had 4 violations.

Lucille’s BBQ in Delray Marketplace had 7 violations.

Johnny B’s Pizza on 441 near the county line had 8 violations.

Our full spreadsheet is below:

allinsp-11-25-2018

34 Violations at Odyssey Diner: RatOn Restaurant Report

Image by Google

Odyssey Diner on Jog Road in Delray Beach had the worst numbers for this report with 34 violations including 6 marked high priority and with multiple stop sales.

  • Employee touching ready-to-eat food with their bare hands – food was not being heated as a sole ingredient to 145 degrees F or immediately added to other ingredients to be cooked/heated to the minimum required temperature to allow bare hand contact. Establishment has no approved Alternative Operating Procedure….cutting onion for salad with bare hands . Employee discarded food at time of inspection. Discussed with operator. **Corrected On-Site**
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food cold held at greater than 41 degrees Fahrenheit….butter 55°, cream cheese 58° in two door tall reach in cooler at server station ( other food 43° in same cooler). Operator stated that keep opening door made temperature high . Operator ice down on food at time of inspection. **Corrective Action Taken** **Repeat Violation**
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food held using time as a public health control marked with a time that exceeds the 4-hour limit. See stop sale…..ham, eggs, feta cheese, cut tomatoes, cut lettuce. Operator discarded food at time of inspection. **Corrected On-Site**
  • Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food hot held at less than 135 degrees Fahrenheit or above….sweet potatoes 81° in warmer drawer at servers station being held from yesterday. Stop sale issue. Operator discarded food at time of inspection. **Corrective Action Taken**
  • Stop Sale issued due to food not being in a wholesome, sound condition.
  • Stop Sale issued on potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food due to temperature abuse….. Potentially hazardous (time/temperature control for safety) food hot held at less than 135 degrees Fahrenheit or above….sweet potatoes 81° in warmer drawer at servers station being held from yesterday. **Repeat Violation**

But that may not be the worst inspection of the week. Taverna Trela on Linton in Delray had a couple disturbing notes among the 8 high priority violations (23 total):

  • Presence of insects, one live worm like insect on handle of rice cooker.
  • Roach activity present as evidenced by live roaches found. 4 live roaches under prep table at cook line. 1 live roach on floor under 2 compartment sink next to ice machine. 3 live roaches inside oven next to gyro station. 4 live roaches under gyro station. 3 live roaches under flip top cooler across from fryer. 2 live roaches under dish machine. 2 live roaches on floor under hand wash sink next to fryer. 20+ live roaches in side convection oven at cook line. 2 live roaches in wait area. No doors separating any of the areas.

In West Boca the biggest number was for Lemongrass Hot Pot in the Boca Grove plaza with 21 violations, 3 of them high priority. Other notables with 10 or more violations include the Steak N Shake on 441 in Coral Springs (15 violations, 2 high priority), Positano (13, 2) and Renzo’s Cafe Pizzeria (13, 1) on Federal Highway in East Boca, and Duffy’s on Hillsboro in Coconut Creek (13, 2).

Good News

Two places in West Boca scored perfect inspections with zero violations: Jon Smith Subs in Mission Bay and Press Creamery in the Reserve at 441 and Clint Moore.

The McDonald’s in Shadowood, LuBlu in Somerset Shoppes (Lyons and Glades) and Kapow Noodle Bar in Mizner Park all had near perfect inspections with 1 violation each.

Also doing well were Panera in Mission Bay, Jersey Mike’s Subs in Somerset Shoppes, and Lucille’s BBQ in Woodfield with 2 violations.

The Melting Pot on Federal Highway had 3 violations, 2 high priority.

Also worth a mention:

  • Renzo’s on Clint Moore (4 violations, 1 high priority)
  • Dominic’s on Glades near Boca Rio (4, 0)
  • Little Brazil near Dominic’s (7, 3)
  • Panera in Boca Center (4, 0)
  • Bluefin Express on Yamato (4, 1)
  • McDonald’s on Palmetto just west of Powerline (4, 1)
  • Sushi Rock in East Boca (5, 1)
  • Mississippi Sweets BBQ in East Boca (5, 2)
  • Cannoli Kitchen on Powerline (6, 4)
  • Villa Rosano in the Reserve (6, 1)
  • Kee Grill on Military Trail (6, 0)
  • Casa Tequila on Glades near Boca Rio (6, 0)
  • Subway next to Casq Tequila (6, 1)
  • Bonefish Grill in Boca Grove (6, 0)
  • Hashi Sushi Thai in Shadowood (7, 2)

Our full spreadsheet for this report is below:

allinsp11-12-2018

A Transportation Revolution is Coming to West Boca and the World

This post was motivated in part by a conversation the other night with a junior at West Boca High.

Our world has changed dramatically over the last hundred years or so. It’s already visible in West Boca and the changes are accelerating. For one take on all the changes and the coming artificial intelligence revolution see this great blog post on Wait But Why.

Imagine taking a time machine back to 1750 … When you get there, you retrieve a dude, bring him to 2015, and then walk him around and watch him react to everything …

This experience for him wouldn’t be surprising or shocking or even mind-blowing — those words aren’t big enough. He might actually die. …

Because of the Law of Accelerating Returns … the 21st century will achieve 1,000 times the progress of the 20th century. If … correct, then we may be as blown away by 2030 as our 1750 guy was by 2015

One piece of this change has already started happening with Uber and Lyft changing how we get places. Cars that drive themselves are becoming reality. But that’s just the beginning.

There’s a 2016 report from McKinsey on autonomous cars that gives some idea of what’s coming, though it may underestimate the speed of these changes.

Once technological and regulatory issues have been resolved, up to 15 percent of new cars sold in 2030 could be fully autonomous.

Companies like Tesla and Google subsidiary Waymo are pushing hard toward fully autonomous cars. They may only be a few years away. Combine this with the Uber/Lyft ridesharing model as Tesla plans to do, and the cost of a ride drops by 50% or more because you no longer have to pay the driver. There are other potential savings including reduced insurance costs and lower operating costs for electric vehicles.

But that’s only part of the transportation revolution. Along with Tesla, Elon Musk is also pursuing another radical change through tunnels The Boring Company. There are two big ideas in this. For local transport within a metropolitan area they’re pursuing Loop:

Loop is a high-speed underground public transportation system in which passengers are transported on autonomous electric skates traveling at 125-150 miles per hour. Electric skates will carry between 8 and 16 passengers (mass transit), or a single passenger vehicle.

For longer distances such as trips between cities they’re talking about Hyperloop:

Hyperloop is an ultra high-speed underground public transportation system in which passengers are transported on autonomous electric pods traveling at 600+ miles per hour in a pressurized cabin. Similar to Loop, Hyperloop pods will transport between 8 and 16 passengers (mass transit), or a single passenger vehicle.

Musk and his Boring partner Steve Davis discussed what they’re doing in an hour long session this past May:

There’s a good summary of that on GeekWire.

On a local level picture a typical metropolitan area like South Florida with several tunnels. A couple of them run north to south from Miami to Jupiter and several run east to west such as underneath Glades Road in Boca, Atlantic in Delray, and Hillsboro south of the county line. The vast majority of residents live and work within a few miles of a tunnel. You can get where you want to go with a short and inexpensive rideshare from home, a high speed loop ride, and another short walk or rideshare to your destination. You go from your home in West Boca to the American Airlines Arena in 30 minutes for $10. You can go to Mizner Park or the beach in 10 minutes for $6. Add Hyperloop to this story and you get to DisneyWorld or UF in 30 minutes for $25. New York City is a 2 hour ride for maybe $60. If you really get into it SpaceX may deliver travel to anywhere in the world in under an hour.

This may be only 20 years away. Many people will decide not to bother owning a car, saving thousands of dollars a year. This frees up a lot of money for consumer spending in other areas, and it will impact existing industries.

From an investor perspective many car companies and airlines will collapse. BMW and Mercedes sedan sales are already starting to go down due to Tesla’s rise. We already see a lot of this in and near West Boca with a Tesla store in Town Center Mall and a large Tesla charging area at Delray Marketplace.

New Tesla charging station at Delray Marketplace; image from https://www.teslaownersflorida.org/Public-News/6353657

Some car companies will manage to join the electric revolution, but others will fail. Autonomous tractor-trailers like the Tesla Semi could deliver a death blow to conventional truck manufacturers and the rail industry, all while lowering the cost of consumer goods. Car insurance companies will be toast as rideshare companies self-insure. Reduced car accident deaths will increase life expectancy. Miami may become tolerable.

The shift to electric transportation will dramatically reduce demand for oil. According to the US Energy Information Administration 71% of US oil consumption goes to gasoline and diesel for cars, trucks, trains and boats. The price of oil will plummet, taking oil companies down. Millions of jobs in the US will vanish, and the same for millions more overseas.

Some of the effects are harder to see. Parking garages will become unnecessary as riders are dropped off by the rideshare. Plazas like Mizner Park and Promenade could replace their parking structures with apartments or more shops. The parking nightmares at Westwinds and Delray Marketplace would be over.

Individual and family housing decisions might change. Some might choose to live near a tunnel for convenience, but it also becomes easier to live out in the sticks. New homes won’t need garages – though many of us use garages for storage rather than cars.

As these changes take place, capital will be freed up along with consumer dollars that can open up new markets, industries and job creation that are very hard to predict.

How do you think this might play out? Let us know in the comments.

Warren Redlich, the author of this blog, is an investor in Tesla, along with other companies (such as Honda) that might be affected by these projections.