Book Review: Nothing is Forgotten by Peter Golden


I had the pleasure of reading an advance copy of Peter Golden’s latest book, Nothing Is Forgotten. The book will be released on April 10th. I reviewed his last novel, Wherever There Is Light, in 2015.
As he showed with his previous novels, Golden is a master at weaving together different threads of the story. Nothing is Forgotten takes the reader on a multidimensional journey, traveling through a range of geography, history, culture, and especially emotions. Places are depicted vividly, with bits of the local language and cuisine dropped here and there to add flavor.
It may be of particular interest to many here in southern Palm Beach County because of its references to European and American Jews, as well as Russia and Eastern Europe.
The novel touches on various genres including coming of age, love story, spy thriller, and war, bringing them all together into a fascinating and deeply moving tale.

Peter Golden (left) interviewing Mikhail Gorbachev in his non-fiction days.

I highly recommend Nothing Is Forgotten.

Review: Padano Bistro in Loggers' Run

All photos copyright Warren Redlich 2016
All photos copyright Warren Redlich 2016. Unfortunately I did not have either of my good cameras with me so these are cell phone pictures which do not handle lighting and colors as well. The food definitely looked better in person.

There’s a new Italian restaurant in the Loggers’ Run plaza. It’s in the same location as the old Mama’s, but the interior and menu are new and different.
On the inside we noticed upgraded materials throughout. It looks nicer and feels roomier even though it’s the same space.
padano-interior
This is of course a restaurant so the food’s the thing. It’s good. We won’t go so far as to say great, but it’s better than the last two operations in the space.
The soups were the best part of our meal. They come out with covers and they’re so hot you can’t really eat them for a minute so you have to wait while you smell them.
Escarole and beans (aka greens and beans)
Escarole and beans (aka greens and beans)

Pasta Fagioli
Pasta Fagioli

Pricing is a potential issue. The soups are $7 which seems like a lot. But you get a lot – we ate about half of our soups and took the rest home. Unlike many other places there’s no deal where you get a cup of soup with the entree for a lower price. Also they did not serve bread with the meal. It costs extra.
On the entree side the pasta dishes we ordered were in the ballpark of $13, which is reasonable. The dishes were not exactly what we expected, both in the way they looked and the taste. But they were still good enough and we certainly ate our fill. You’ll have to try it yourself to see if you like the way they cook them. As with the soups the entrees came with ample portion sizes.
Linguini Bolognese
Linguini Bolognese

Gnocchi
Gnocchi

Rigatoni with Meatball
Rigatoni with Meatball

We did not try the more expensive entrees or the pizza. A friend who knows pizza ate here before we did and said the pizza is excellent though he thought the ones with toppings were a bit pricey.
Padano is definitely worth a try, especially if you live in the Loggers’ Run area. They’re still a work in progress. The website doesn’t reflect that they’re open yet and we can’t find a menu online.

Nikuya in Loggers' Run: Restaurant Review

nikuya-front
After Marcus Kosher Chinese closed, it didn’t take long for Nikuya to open in its place. Billing itself as a Thai and Sushi bistro, they actually have a deeper Japanese menu that attracted us. It’s located in the Shoppes at Loggers’ Run, on the north side of Palmetto Park Road about a mile and a half west of 441:

It’s not cheap, and that’s a good thing. Nor is it terribly expensive. Entrees are mostly between $12 and $17. We didn’t get there sooner because we mostly do our reviews at lunch time and they’re don’t open until 4 pm. We hear they may add lunch service soon. The interior is clean and fresh. There’s room for maybe 30 people at the tables and another 8 or so at the sushi bar. Due to the layout it might be difficult to seat a larger party and we recommend calling first if that’s your plan.
We started with one of our favorite Japanese appetizers, Gyoza. These are dumplings that can be served either steamed (which we prefer) or fried. At $7 it might seem pricey but it came with six pieces and they were excellent.
gyoza
Please note that better versions of most of the photos in this article can be seen by clicking on them.
Next up was something we didn’t order. Maybe it’s normal or maybe it’s because they noticed the camera, but the waitress brought us out a tuna and avocado appetizer as a courtesy from the chef. Both the tuna and the avocado were noticeably higher quality than another West Boca Japanese place we visited on Christmas Day. The tuna was lightly marinated in a delicate sauce that was perfect for the dish.
tuna-avocado-app
We also decided to try a roll that seems popular in South Florida – The JB Roll, with salmon and cream cheese. And maybe we got a little carried away with the camera:
jb-roll-long
jb-roll-bokeh
At $8, again it’s not the lowest cost sushi around. But it was a long roll with a lot of pieces and we liked it. Perhaps the only downside of the meal was that the pickled ginger didn’t seem quite right. Maybe it’s just a different flavor but it’s not what this author expected.
One of the kids with us ordered the chicken fried rice, which is a fairly standard dish in Japan – Yakimeshi (炒飯). It’s similar to fried rice in a Chinese restaurant but typically uses a higher grade of rice which seemed to be the case here. It also had a rich comfort-food smell and taste.
yakimeshi
The highlight of the meal for this author was something one rarely sees in South Florida – a good bowl of ramen. Americans tend to think of ramen in terms of the cheap instant cup-noodle dishes we see in stores. Ramen is a staple meal in Japan and excellent when done well. For a funny view of that see the Jyuzo Itami movie Tampopo (though not for kids).
At Nikuya they have both Chashu Pork Ramen ($14) and Miso Butter Pork Ramen ($16). I tried the latter and it was the best bowl of ramen I’ve had in a long time.
miso-butter-ramen
Sixteen bucks is a lot for a bowl of soup, but this is a very filling entree size and they nailed it in all ways including smell, flavor, consistency, and presentation. They even had the Japanese spice Togarashi when I asked for it.
The other adult at the table had the Cashew Nut Chicken from the Thai menu. It was colorful and enjoyable, another example of a restaurant doing a great job in how they plate the food and present it to the customer.
cashew-chicken
We got a little carried away and ordered two desserts, the Tortino Chocolate Lava and the Fried Banana.
lava-large
fry-banana-large
As with everything else these were presented well. The chocolate lava cake was delicious. The fried banana was pretty and tasted pretty good, but we probably would not order that again. Also the ice cream didn’t seem to be top grade, but went well with the desserts. Next time we hope to try the Cheesecake Roll and maybe the Thai Donut.
We will go back again soon and try more of the Thai menu. There seem to be fewer curry choices than we usually see at Thai restaurants, with both Green Curry and Panang Curry notably absent.
For lower cost Japanese food we’ll keep going to Jidai Kaiten Sushi on Powerline Road in Boca Grove, especially with their ongoing lunch deal.